Caring For the Caregiver: Practical ways of helping you care for a person with memory loss and confusion-helping you help others.

Caring for the Caregiver: Practical ways of helping you care for a person with memory loss and confusion-helping you help others. Tips for caregivers.

Caring for a person with memory loss and confusion can be stressful and exhausting. These tips can help you find the support you need.

  1. Ask for Help:

*Ask a friend to fix dinner or a relative to help out for an hour each week.

*Make a list of ways others can help. When a friend asks, “What can I do?” have them choose from a list.

*Don’t wait for a crisis. Ask for and accept help on a regular basis.

*Even if asking is hard, find at least one resource you can use right away.

2. Express your feelings:

*Recognize that feelings of frustration, sadness, anger and depression are normal under the circumstances.

*Talk about your feelings with a friend, relative, counselor or caregiver support group.

3. Take care of your health:

*Make sure you are eating a healthy diet, getting regular physical activity and getting plenty of rest.

*Learn and use stress reduction techniques.

*Don’t put off your own medical care. Talk with your doctor about getting flu shots and other preventive care.

4. Learn about the disease:

*Find out about the different forms and stages of dementia so that you are not taken by surprise when new behaviors occur.

*If you can, provide information to family and friends so they will know how to best to support you.

5. Avoid Isolation:

*Pursue a hobby or take a class. Join a reading or discussion group.

*Become active in a community organization.

6. Talk with professionals:

*Contact a social worker or your local social services agency to help you find out about caregiving resources.

*Talk with an attorney or legal aid service about legal issues. Many areas have free or low-cost legal aid available.

*Talk with an accountant about finances.

*Find a counselor or therapist to help you deal with your feelings.

7. Look for signs of burnout:

*Not taking care of your own health, feeling lonely, crying or losing your temper more than usual are all signs that you may need some help.

*Take an honest look at your use of sedatives and alcohol. Have a doctor or counselor help you evaluate your use.

*Find someone to talk to if you feel discouraged, frustrated, trapped or over-burdened.

*Seek professional help if you are depressed or thinking about suicide.

8. Give yourself a treat:

*Buy yourself a present such as a favorite magazine or new clothes.

*Watch a sunset.

*Put your feet up and listen to a symphony or a ball game on the radio.

*Order dinner from your favorite restaurant and have it delivered.

*Buy yourself flowers.

9. Take time for yourself:

*Consider using respite care, homecare or adult day care.

*Schedule regular time for yourself. Plan to spend an hour each day or an afternoon once a week away from caregiving.

*Consider taking a vacation.

*If time or money is a concern, be creative! Ask for help from friends or relatives and use community services. You are worth it!

*Remember, you will be better able to care for another if you take time for yourself.

10. Investigate local services:

*Find out if meals are delivered to seniors or home-bound people in your area.

*Contact your local senior center to help you find resources.

*Find out about assisted living facilities. Even if you do not want to use one now, you may need to in the future.

Disclaimer: this information was taken directly from the Journeyworks Publishing pamphlet written by Mardi Richmond. The information is helpful to all caregiver and please look at Journeyworks other pamphlets. They are a huge source of information and advice on helping caregivers. These pamphlets are available in most  Nursing facilities.

 

About jwatrel

I am a free-lance writer and Blogger. I am the author of the book "Firehouse 101" (IUniverse.com 2005) part of trilogy of books centered in New York City. My next book "Love Triangles" is finished being edited and should be ready for release in the Fall. My latest book, "Dinner at Midnight", a thriller is on its last chapter. My long awaited book explains the loss of the 2004 Yankee game to Boston. I work as a Consultant, Adjunct College Professor, Volunteer Fireman and Ambulance member and Blogger. I have a blog site for caregivers called 'bergencountycaregiver', a step by step survival guide to all you wonderful folks taking care of your loved ones, a walking project to walk every block, both sides, of the island of Manhattan "MywalkinManhattan" and discuss what I see and find on the streets of New York and three sites to accompany it. One is an arts site called "Visiting a Museum", where I showcase small museums, historical sites and parks that are off the beaten track both in Manhattan and outside the city to cross reference with "MywalkinManhattan" blog site. Another is "DiningonaShoeStringNYC", featuring small restaurants I have found on my travels in this project, that offer wonderful meals for $10.00 and under. So be on the lookout for updates on all three sites and enjoy 'MywalkinManhattan'. The third is my latest site, "LittleShoponMainStreet", which showcases all the unique and independent shops that I have found on my travels throughout and around Manhattan. I have started two new blog sites for the fire department, one "EngineOneHasbrouck HeightsFireDepartmentnj" for the Hasbrouck Heights Fire Department to discuss what our Engine Company is doing and the other is "BergenCountyFireman'sHomeAssociation" for the Bergen County Fireman's Association, which fire fighters from Bergen County, NJ, go to the Fireman's Home in Boonton, NJ to bring entertainment and cheer to our fellow brother fire fighters quarterly.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Caring For the Caregiver: Practical ways of helping you care for a person with memory loss and confusion-helping you help others.

  1. jwatrel says:

    To all follow caregivers, please take care of yourself first! You can’t take care of anyone if you do not look out for yourself.

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s