Important Natural Gas Safety Information: What everyone needs to know.

Important Natural Gas Safety Information: What everyone needs to know.

Smell Gas? Leave the premises and call us immediately!

1-800-880-PSEG (7734) or 911 PSE&G

How to recognize a gas leak:

*Smell: An odor similar to rotten eggs is added to help you recognize it. Not all pipelines are ‘odorized’ and the odor can fade over time.

*Sight: Seeing a white cloud, mist, fog, bubbles in standing water or blowing dust or vegetation that appears to be dead or dying for no apparent reason.

*Sound: Hearing an usual noise like roaring, hissing or whistling.

Knowing what’s below. Call 811 before you dig. It’s the law!

Digging causes almost 60% of all accidental damage to underground natural gas pipelines. Even a hand can cause enough damage to create a leak online failure.

What to do if you suspect a leak?

Move to a safe environment and call us immediately. Do not use your telephone or cell phone in your home.

Provide the exact location with cross streets.

Do not smoke, light candles or operate electrical switches or appliances. Doing so can produce a spark, ignite the gas and cause an explosion.

Let us know if sewer construction or digging activities are going on in the area.

Before you excavate:

Whether you are a professional or a do-it-yourself before you excavate you must call to have  the exact position of nearby underground natural gas lines marked.

It’s free and easy.

  1. The law requires you to call 811 before you dig.
  2. Your request will be forwarded to your local gas operator and a worker will be dispatched to mark the line’s location.
  3. Once the marks are made, pay attention to them and dig with care

 

Educate your family about gas:

It is important for everyone in your family to be familiar with the characteristics of natural gas and be prepared to react properly to ensure your safety and the safety of others.

If you smell gas or suspect a leak, DON’T WAIT!

Leave the premises and call us immediately. Don’t assume someone else will report the condition.

Never Assume!

Natural gas lines often run along public streets and can be near and on private property. Sometimes they may be marked with line markers but very often there will be no indication above ground. Don’t assume that you know where the underground lines are-failure to call 811 can jeopardize public safety, result in costly damages and lead to substantial fines!

Our commitment to safety:

Safety is the natural gas industry’s top priority. Nationwide, more than 2 million miles of pipelines and mains deliver natural gas safety, reliably and efficiently every day for use by residential, commercial and industrial customers

Natural gas has an excellent safety record.

Like all forms of energy, natural gas must be handled properly. If improperly handled, natural gas may cause a hazardous condition such as a fire, explosion or asphyxiation.

How we prepare for emergencies.

We also work with emergency responders and state and local agencies to prevent and prepare for emergencies through training and periodic drills. Emergency plans and procedures are periodically updated and made available to federal and state authorities.

For more information on Natural Gas Safety visit:

northeastgas.org/BeNosey

Smell Gas? Leave the premises and call us immediately!

1-800-880-PSEG (7734) or 911.

PSE&G http://www.pseg.com/safetytips

This safety information provided in partnership with: Northeast Gas Association.

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the PSE&G safety pamphlet and they deserve full credit for the work. Please call or email the above phone numbers or email them for more information.

 

 

 

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About jwatrel

I am a free-lance writer and Blogger. I am the author of the book "Firehouse 101" (IUniverse.com 2005) part of trilogy of books centered in New York City. My next book "Love Triangles" is finished being edited and should be ready for release in the Fall. My latest book, "Dinner at Midnight", a thriller is on its last chapter. My long awaited book explains the loss of the 2004 Yankee game to Boston. I work as a Consultant, Adjunct College Professor, Volunteer Fireman and Ambulance member and Blogger. I have a blog site for caregivers called 'bergencountycaregiver', a step by step survival guide to all you wonderful folks taking care of your loved ones, a walking project to walk every block, both sides, of the island of Manhattan "MywalkinManhattan" and discuss what I see and find on the streets of New York and three sites to accompany it. One is an arts site called "Visiting a Museum", where I showcase small museums, historical sites and parks that are off the beaten track both in Manhattan and outside the city to cross reference with "MywalkinManhattan" blog site. Another is "DiningonaShoeStringNYC", featuring small restaurants I have found on my travels in this project, that offer wonderful meals for $10.00 and under. So be on the lookout for updates on all three sites and enjoy 'MywalkinManhattan'. The third is my latest site, "LittleShoponMainStreet", which showcases all the unique and independent shops that I have found on my travels throughout and around Manhattan. I have started two new blog sites for the fire department, one "EngineOneHasbrouck HeightsFireDepartmentnj" for the Hasbrouck Heights Fire Department to discuss what our Engine Company is doing and the other is "BergenCountyFireman'sHomeAssociation" for the Bergen County Fireman's Association, which fire fighters from Bergen County, NJ, go to the Fireman's Home in Boonton, NJ to bring entertainment and cheer to our fellow brother fire fighters quarterly.
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One Response to Important Natural Gas Safety Information: What everyone needs to know.

  1. jwatrel says:

    Please call or email PSE&G for more information.

    Liked by 1 person

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