How to Avoid a Scam

How to Avoid a Scam

Four signs that it’s a scam

*Scammers pretend to be from an organization you know:

Scammers often pretend to be contacting you on behalf of the government. They might use a real name, like Social Security Administration, the IRS or Medicare of make up a name that sounds official. Some pretend to be from a business you know, like a utility company, a tech company or even a charity asking for donations.

They use technology to change the phone number that appears on your caller ID. So, the name and number you see might not be real.

*Scammers say there’s a problem or a prize:

They might say you’re in trouble with the government. Or you owe money. Or someone in your family had an emergency. Or that there’s a virus on your computer.

Some scammers say there’s a problem with one of your accounts and that you need to verify some information. Others will lie and say you won money in a lottery or sweepstakes but have to pay a fee to get it.

*Scammers pressure you to act immediately.

Scammers want you to act before you have time to think. If you’re on the phone, they might tell you not to hang up so you can’t check out their story.

They might threaten to arrest you, sue you, take away your driver’s or business license or deport you. They might say your computer is about to be corrupted.

*Scammers tell you to pay in a specific way.

They often insist that you pay by sending money through a money transfer company or by putting money on a gift card and then giving them the number on the back. Some will send you a check (that will later turn out to be a fake), tell you to deposit it and then send them money.

What you can do to avoid a scam:

*Block unwanted calls and text messages. Take steps to block unwanted calls and to filter unwanted text messages.

*Don’t give your personal or financial information in response to a request that you didn’t expect. Legitimate organization won’t call, email or text to ask for your personal information, like your Social Security, bank account or credit card numbers.

If you get an email or text message from a company you do business with and you think it’s real, it’s still best not to click on any links. Instead, contact them using a website you know is trustworthy. Or look up their phone number. Don’t call a number they gave you or the number from your called ID.

*Resist the pressure to act immediately.

Legitimate businesses will give you time to make a decision. Anyone who pressures you to pay or give them your personal information is a scammer.

*Know how scammers tell you to pay.

Never pay someone who insists you pay with a gift card or by using a money transfer service. And never deposit a check and send money back to someone.

*Stop and talk to someone you trust.

Before you do anything else, tell someone-a friend, a family member, a neighbor-what happened. Talking about it could help you realize it’s a scam.

Report scams to the FTC. If you were scammed or think you saw a scam, report it to the Federal Trade Commission.

ReportFraud.ftc.gov/Federal Trade Commission

https://www.ftc.gov/faq/consumer-protection/submit-consumer-complaint-ftc

https://reportfraud.ftc.gov/

Disclaimer: This is information was taken directly from the Federal Trade Commission Fraud Alert pamphlet and I give them full credit for the information. Please check out their website for more information.

About jwatrel

I am a free-lance writer and Blogger. I am the author of the book "Firehouse 101" (IUniverse.com 2005) part of trilogy of books centered in New York City. My next book "Love Triangles" is finished being edited and should be ready for release in the Fall. My latest book, "Dinner at Midnight", a thriller is on its last chapter. My long awaited book explains the loss of the 2004 Yankee game to Boston. I work as a Consultant, Adjunct College Professor, Volunteer Fireman and Ambulance member and Blogger. I have a blog site for caregivers called 'bergencountycaregiver', a step by step survival guide to all you wonderful folks taking care of your loved ones, a walking project to walk every block, both sides, of the island of Manhattan "MywalkinManhattan" and discuss what I see and find on the streets of New York and three sites to accompany it. One is an arts site called "Visiting a Museum", where I showcase small museums, historical sites and parks that are off the beaten track both in Manhattan and outside the city to cross reference with "MywalkinManhattan" blog site. Another is "DiningonaShoeStringNYC", featuring small restaurants I have found on my travels in this project, that offer wonderful meals for $10.00 and under. So be on the lookout for updates on all three sites and enjoy 'MywalkinManhattan'. The third is my latest site, "LittleShoponMainStreet", which showcases all the unique and independent shops that I have found on my travels throughout and around Manhattan. I have started two new blog sites for the fire department, one "EngineOneHasbrouck HeightsFireDepartmentnj" for the Hasbrouck Heights Fire Department to discuss what our Engine Company is doing and the other is "BergenCountyFireman'sHomeAssociation" for the Bergen County Fireman's Association, which fire fighters from Bergen County, NJ, go to the Fireman's Home in Boonton, NJ to bring entertainment and cheer to our fellow brother fire fighters quarterly.
This entry was posted in Behavioral Health and Psychiatry Services, Fraud Programming, Men's Programming, Scamming and Fraud Programming, Senior Services, Support Services for Seniors, Uncategorized, Woman's Programming and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to How to Avoid a Scam

  1. jwatrel says:

    Please check the Federal Trade Commission website on Fraud Alert for more information.

    Liked by 1 person

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