Babysitters’ Fire Safety Tips

Babysitters’ Fire Safety Tips

Taking care of children is serious business and preventing fires and knowing what to do in a fire emergency are part of the job.

An Escape Plan:

As the adults who hired you about the household’s plan for escaping a fire. You’ll find out what they expect you to do, and you’ll be reminding them to plan ahead for fire emergencies.

*Have them give you a home tour. Learn where all the windows and doors are and make sure you can open them.

*Find two ways out of each room-especially bedrooms.

*Make sure the family has decided on an outside meeting place where everyone is supposed to go when they’ve escaped a fire. (So, you can count heads and make sure everyone is out).

*Don’t scare the kids but talk to them about escaping a fire. Find out how much they know and whatever you do, don’t confuse them by changing their household escape plans.

Stay with the Kids:

Supervise the children when they’re awake and check on them often when they’re in bed. Once they’re sound asleep, stay close enough to hear them if they wake up.

Basic Precautions:

*Don’t smoke. Put matches and lighters away-up high where children can’t reach them in a locked cabinet.

*Keep space heaters at least 3 feet away from anything that can burn. (And keep the children away from space heaters too).

*If you’re allowed to cook, declare a “kid-free zone” three feet around the stove or microwave. Turn pot handles in toward the center of the stove so children can’t grab them. Never leave the room when you’re cooking and keep toys, clothing, paper and other clutter off the stove.

*Follow the instructions for microwave meals and never put any container in a microwave unless you’re positive it’s safe. Never microwave anything for longer than the instructions say to. If you’re not sure how to use a microwave, don’t. Let foods cooked in microwaves cool, then open the container carefully.

If there’s a fire:

Your first job is to get yourself and the children outside.

*Then stay out.

*Don’t go back for anything. When everyone’s arrived at the meeting place, take the children with you to call the fire department from a neighbor’s phone or call from a portable phone if you have one.

*Give the fire department the exact address of the fire and stay on the phone until they tell you it’s okay to hang up. Then call the adults who hired you.

Escape Tips:

*If you run into smoke while you’re escaping, try another way out. If you can’t avoid the smoke, crawl low on your hands and knees with your head 1 to 2 feet above the floor.

*Test doors before you open them-if there’s fire on the other side, it will feel warm around the cracks.

*Kneel down, then reach up as high as you can and touch the door-at the knob and around the frame-with the back of your hand.

*If the door’s cool, open it with caution. If it’s warm, try another escape route.

If you can’t get to the children:

If smoke or flames are blocking the way to the children’s bedrooms, leave the building and call the fire department from a neighbor’s home or a portable phone. Tell them where the children are trapped.

Make sure to write down any emergency information before the parents leave the home for the evening.

National Fire Protection Association:

http://www.nfpa.org/

Babysitting Safety site:

https://www.nfpa.org/-/media/Files/Public-Education/Resources/Safety-tip-sheets/BabysittingSafety.ashx

Disclaimer: This information was taken directly from the National Fire Protection Association pamphlet on Fire Safety Tips for Babysitters, and I give them full credit for their information. Please check out the National Fire Protection Association website for more information.

About jwatrel

I am a free-lance writer and Blogger. I am the author of the book "Firehouse 101" (IUniverse.com 2005) part of trilogy of books centered in New York City. My next book "Love Triangles" is finished being edited and should be ready for release in the Fall. My latest book, "Dinner at Midnight", a thriller is on its last chapter. My long awaited book explains the loss of the 2004 Yankee game to Boston. I work as a Consultant, Adjunct College Professor, Volunteer Fireman and Ambulance member and Blogger. I have a blog site for caregivers called 'bergencountycaregiver', a step by step survival guide to all you wonderful folks taking care of your loved ones, a walking project to walk every block, both sides, of the island of Manhattan "MywalkinManhattan" and discuss what I see and find on the streets of New York and three sites to accompany it. One is an arts site called "Visiting a Museum", where I showcase small museums, historical sites and parks that are off the beaten track both in Manhattan and outside the city to cross reference with "MywalkinManhattan" blog site. Another is "DiningonaShoeStringNYC", featuring small restaurants I have found on my travels in this project, that offer wonderful meals for $10.00 and under. So be on the lookout for updates on all three sites and enjoy 'MywalkinManhattan'. The third is my latest site, "LittleShoponMainStreet", which showcases all the unique and independent shops that I have found on my travels throughout and around Manhattan. I have started two new blog sites for the fire department, one "EngineOneHasbrouck HeightsFireDepartmentnj" for the Hasbrouck Heights Fire Department to discuss what our Engine Company is doing and the other is "BergenCountyFireman'sHomeAssociation" for the Bergen County Fireman's Association, which fire fighters from Bergen County, NJ, go to the Fireman's Home in Boonton, NJ to bring entertainment and cheer to our fellow brother fire fighters quarterly.
This entry was posted in Child Program Services, Fire Fighting/First Responder Programming, Home Care Programs, New Jersey Children's Programs, New York Children's Program, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Babysitters’ Fire Safety Tips

  1. jwatrel says:

    Please have a game plan whenever you are babysitting in someone else’s home.

    Liked by 1 person

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