Eat Right: 20 Ways to Enjoy More Fruits and Vegetables

Eat Right: 20 Ways to Enjoy More Fruits and Vegetables

Food, Nutrition and Health tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Building a healthy plate is easy when you make half your plate fruits and vegetables. It’s also a great way to add color, flavor and texture plus vitamins, minerals and fiber. All this is packed in fruits and vegetables that are low in calories and fat. Make 2 cups of fruit and 2 1/2 cups of vegetables your daily goal. Try the following tips to enjoy more fruits and vegetables every day.

  1. Variety abounds when using vegetables as pizza topping. Try broccoli, spinach, green peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms and zucchini.
  2. Mix up a breakfast smoothie made with low fat milk, frozen strawberries and a banana.
  3. Make a veggie wrap with roasted vegetables and low fat cheese rolled in a whole wheat tortilla.
  4. Try crunchy vegetables instead of chips with your favorite low fat salad dressing for dipping.
  5. Grill colorful vegetable kabobs packed with tomatoes, green and red peppers, mushrooms and onions.
  6. Add color to salads with baby carrots, grape tomatoes, spinach leaves or mandarin oranges.
  7. Keep cut vegetables handy for mid-afternoon snacks, side dishes, lunch box additions or a quick nibble while waiting for dinner. Ready to eat favorites: red, green or yellow peppers, broccoli or cauliflower florets, carrots, celery sticks, cucumbers, snap peas or whole radishes.
  8. Place colorful fruit where everyone can easily grab something for a snack on the run. Keep a bowl of fresh, just ripe whole fruit in the center of your kitchen or dining table.
  9. Get saucy with fruit. Puree apples, berries, peaches or pears in a blender for a thick, sweet sauce on grilled or broiled seafood or poultry or on pancakes, French Toast or waffles.
  10. Stuff an omelet with vegetables. Turn any omelet into hearty meal with broccoli, squash, carrots, peppers, tomatoes or onions with low fat sharp cheddar cheese.
  11. “Sandwich” in fruits and vegetables. Add pizzazz to sandwiches with sliced pineapple, apple, peppers, cucumbers and tomato as fillings.
  12. Wake up to fruit. Make a habit of adding fruit to your morning oatmeal, ready to eat cereal, yogurt or toaster waffle.
  13. Top a baked potato with beans and salsa or broccoli and low fat cheese.
  14. Microwave a cup of vegetable soup as a snack or with a sandwich for lunch.
  15. Add grated, shredded or chopped vegetables such as zucchini, spinach and carrots to lasagna, meat loaf, mashed potatoes, pasta sauce and rice dishes.
  16. Make fruit your dessert: Slice a banana lengthwise and top with a scoop of low fat frozen yogurt. Sprinkle with a tablespoon of chopped nuts.
  17. Stock your freezer with frozen vegetables to steam or stir-fry for a quick side dish.
  18. Make your main dish a salad of dark, leafy greens and other colorful vegetables. Add chickpeas or edamame (fresh soybeans). Top with low fat dressing*
  19. Fruit on the grill: Make kabobs with pineapple, peaches and banana. Grill on low heat until fruit is hot and slightly golden.
  20. Dip: Whole wheat pita wedges in hummus, baked tortilla chips in salsa, strawberries or apple slices in low fat yogurt or graham crackers in applesauce.

 

*See: “Color your plate with salad” at http://www.eatright.org/nutritiontipsheets for more tips on creating healthy salads. For a referral to a registered dietitian and for additional food and nutrition information visit http://www.eatright.org. Eat Right!

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy.

Disclaimer: This information was authored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitians and I give them full credit for the information. Please contact them at the email or the numbers above as well.

 

 

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Eat Right: Eating Right for a Healthy Weight

Eating Right: Eating Right for a Healthy Weight

Food, Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Reaching and maintaining a healthier weight contributes to your overall health and well being. Losing even a few pounds or preventing further weight gain has health benefits.

Are you ready to make changes in your lifestyle and move toward a healthier weights? Here are some tips to get you started:

*Start with a plan for lifelong health: Focus on the big picture-achieving overall good health-not just short term weight loss.

*Set healthy, realistic goals: You are likely to succeed in reaching realistic goals when you make changes step by step. Start with one or two specific; small changes at a time. Track your progress by keeping a food and activity log.

*Get a personalized eating plan: Go to http://www.ChooseMyPlate.gov for a plan that will give you the amounts of each food group you need daily. If you have special dietary needs, consult a registered dietitian for a customized plan.

*Eat at least three meals a day and plan your meals ahead of time: whether you’re eating at home, packing a lunch or eating out, an overall eating plan for the day will help keep you on track.

*Balance your plate with a variety of foods: Half your plate should be filled with fruits and vegetables, about one fourth with lean meat, poultry or fish and one fourth with grains. To round out your meal, add fat free or low fat milk, yogurt or cheese.

*Focus on your food: Pick one place to sit down and eat at home. Eating while doing other things may lead to eating more than you think. Also, switching from a large plate to a smaller one may help you feel satisfied with reduced portions.

*Know when you’ve had enough to eat: Quit before you feel full or stuffed. It takes about 20 minutes for your brain to get the message that your body is getting food. When your brain gets this message, you stop feeling hungry. So fast eaters-slow down and give your brain chance to get the word.

*Get plenty of fiber from fruits, vegetables, beans and whole grains: fiber can help you feel full longer and lower your risk for heart disease and type 2 diabetes.

*Watch portion sizes to manage your calories intake: thisĀ  is the key to an effective weight management plan. To make sure your portion sizes are “just right” visit the MyPlate Food Groups Food Galleries at http://www.choosemyplate.gov/STEPS/howmuchshouldyoueat.html for healthy eating guidelines in household measures.

*Snack Smart: include snacks as part of your daily calorie allowance and limit portions to one serving. Plan for nutritious snacks to prevent between meal hunger. Keep portable, healthy snacks in your desk, backpack or car.

*Find your balance between food and physical activity: regular physical activity is important for your overall health and fitness-plus it helps control body weight, promotes a feeling of well-being and reduces the risk of chronic diseases.

Pick activities you like and do each for at least 10 minutes at a time. Aim for a total of 2 hors and 30 minutes or more each week of moderate activity such as brisk walking. If you are currently inactive, check with your doctor concerning increased physical activity.

*Is it right for you?

Make sure your weight management plan is right for you. Does it include:

*Foods from all five food groups?

*The right number of servings from each group?

*Food you will enjoy eating for the rest of your life?

*Foods you can buy at the supermarket?

*Some of your favorite foods?

*Regular physical activity or exercise?

If the answer is “yes” to all the questions, your weight management plan is right for you.

A registered dietitian can develop a personalized weight management plan that meets your individual needs. For names of registered dietitians in your area, visit http://www.eatright.org.

For more information about healthy eating, visit http://www.eatright.org and http://www.ChooseMyPlate.gov

For a referral to a registered dietitian and for additional food and nutrition information visit http://www.eatright.org.

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the world’s largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the nation’s health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research education and advocacy.

Disclaimer: This tip sheet is provided by the New York State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and authored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff of registered dietitians and sources from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, ADA Complete Food & Nutrition Guide.

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/toolkit

https://www.eatright.org/

https://www.choosemyplate.gov/

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Eat Right: Smart Tips for Reading Menus while Eating Out

Eat Right: Smart Tips for Reading Menus While Eating Out

Food Nutrition and Health Tips from the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

Dining out may be a treat after a busy week or a fun way to mark a celebration. However making the right choices when eating out can also be a challenge. Here are a few tips to keep in mind to help you decipher the menu the next time you eat out.

Nutrition Information:

Many restaurants, bakeries, coffee shops and quick service vendors are required to provide easy to access nutrition information about their foods and beverages right on the menu.

Calories:

The amount of calories for foods that are regularly offered should be listed next to items on menus, order boards or next to the food being served on buffet lines.

Salt, Fat, Carbohydrates and More:

The information posted on the menu is usually limited to calories but sometimes a restaurant may list other nutrients to show that the food is low in fat or high in protein.

Additional nutrition information must also be available on request for most foods served at these restaurants. This includes information about the amount of nutrients, such as sodium, saturated fat and dietary fiber.

If you like to plan ahead, many restaurants also have nutrition information available online, which can help you select healthier options before you arrive and reduce pressure you may feel to order quickly.

Have a Backup Strategy:

Restaurants aren’t required to have nutrition information available if they have fewer than 20 locations. There are also a few exceptions for items such as daily specials, custom orders or condiments.

If nutrition information isn’t available for an item, consider the following tips when you’re deciding what to order.

Limit items that are fried or served in sauces that are high in calories and saturated fat. Some terms to be mindful of include:

*Crunchy, Crispy, Battered and Breaded

*Creamy, Cheesy, Alfredo

Items that are often lower in calories and may be more healthful options include terms such as:

*Baked, Grilled, Roasted., Steamed

*Al Fresco, Marinara

Find your healthy eating style:

Everyone has their own, individual nutrition needs. Find your healthy eating style by using recommendations from MyPlate.

MyPlate

My Plate

Choosing foods and beverages with less saturated fat, sodium and added sugars. Focus on variety, amount and nutrition when crossing what to eat and drink. And start with small changes to build your healthy eating style now and into the future.

MyPlate can help you find a healthy eating style that meets your needs.

Find more healthy eating tips at:

http://www.eatright.org

http://www.kidseatright.org

Make the Right Choices for You:

Nutrition needs vary from person to person. Choose the foods that fit your health needs, eating style and preferences.

These tips may be helpful when trying to make the best choices for you and your family:

*Consider the calorie information when deciding between different dishes and what to order.

*Remember that side dishes add calories too; consider steamed vegetables or fruit as an option when available.

*Save half your meal for later or split dessert with another person for a more appropriate portion size when servings are large or high in calories.

*Rethink your drink. Calories from beverages can add up quickly especially if there are free refills. Choose healthier options like water or low fat or fat free milk or drinks that are calorie free such as unsweetened coffee or tea.

*Ask for sauces and dressings on the side to help control how much actually goes on your food.

For a referral to a registered dietitian nutritionist and for additional food and nutrition information, visit http://www.eatright.org.

Eat Right: The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics is the largest organization of food and nutrition professionals. The Academy is committed to improving the health and advancing the profession of dietetics through research, education and advocacy. This is authored by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics staff registered dietitian nutritionists. Sources include Calories on the Menu, The U.S. Food & Drug Administration, Start Simple with MyPlate, USDA ChooseMyPlate.gov.

Disclaimer: This tip sheet is provided by: The New York State Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (www.eatright.org) and I give them full credit for the work. Please check out their website for more information. Please stay safe at this time.

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/toolkit

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/toolkit

https://www.eatright.org/

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month

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COVID-19: What to do if you are sick with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

COVID-19: What to do if you are sick with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)

If you are sick with COVID-19 or suspect you are infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, follow the steps below to help prevent the disease from spreading to people in your homes and community.

*Stay home except to get medical care:

You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care. Do not go to work, school or public areas. Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing or taxis.

*Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home:

People: As much as possible, you should stay in a specific room and away from other people in your home. Also, you should use a separate bathroom if available.

Animals: Do not hand pets or other animals while sick. See COVID-19 and Animals for more information.

*Call ahead before visiting your doctor:

If you have a medical appointment, call the healthcare provider and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help the healthcare provider’s office take steps to keep other people from getting infected or exposed.

*Wear a Face-mask:

You should wear a facemask when you are around other people (e.g. sharing a room or vehicle) or pets and before you enter a healthcare provider’s office. If you are not able to wear a facemask (for example because it causes trouble breathing) then people who live with you should not stay in the same room with you or they should wear a facemask if they enter your room.

*Cover your coughs and sneezes:

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw used tissues in a lined trash can; immediately wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or clean your hands with an alcohol based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 to 95% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty.

*Avoid sharing personal household items:

You should not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, towels or bedding with other people or pets in your home. After using items, they should be washed thoroughly with soap and water.

*Clean your hands often:

Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with an alcohol based hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol, covering all surfaces of your hands and rubbing them together until they feel dry. Soap and water should be used preferentially if hands are visibly dirty. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

*Clean all “high-touch” surfaces every day:

High touch surfaces include counters, tabletops, doorknobs, bathrooms fixtures, toilets, phones, keyboards, tablets and bedside tables. Also, clean any surfaces that may have blood, stool or body fluids on them. Use a household cleaning spray or wipe according to the label instructions. Labels contain instructions for safe and effective use of the cleaning product including precautions you should take when applying the product such as wearing gloves and making sure you have good ventilation during use of the product.

*Monitor your symptoms:

Seek prompt medical attention if your illness is worsening (e.g. difficulty breathing). Before seeking care, call your healthcare provider and tell them that you have or are being evaluated for COVID_19. Put on a facemask before you enter the facility. These steps will help the healthcare provider’s office to keep other people in the office or waiting room from getting effected or exposed.

Ask you healthcare provider to call the local or state health department. Persons who are placed under active monitoring or facilitated self-monitoring should follow instructions provided by their local health department or occupational health professionals as appropriate.

If you have a medical emergency and need to call 911, notify the dispatch personal that you have or are being evaluated for COVID-19. If possible, put on a facemask before emergency medical services arrive.

*Discontinuing home isolation:

Patients with confirmed COVID-19 should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low. The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case by case basis, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.

For more information: http://www.cdc.gov/COVID-19.

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/home/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Disclaimer: This information was taken directly from the Center for Disease Control pamphlet and I give them full credit for it. Please check out the websites above for more information and call their 1-800 number for more information.

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Additional Coronavirus Information and Resources-NJ Department of Health

Additional Coronavirus Information and Resources

The NJDOH Novel Coronavirus Call Center is open and is taking calls from the general public only. It is open 24/7 and can accommodate callers in multiple languages.

Call 1-800-222-1222

The NJ Department of Human Services operates a toll free ‘warm line’ which is a resource fro people seeking mental health services. The warm line is activated during events that impact the mental health of NJ residents. The warm line is available 24 hours and has languages access: 877-294-HELP (4357). The warm line does NOT replace 911 and is not used to report emergencies.

BC Health Services has up-to-date information on their website:

https://www.co.bergen.nj.us/health-promotion/2019-novel-corona-virus

The CDC Print Resources:

htts://www.cdc.gov.coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/factsheets.html

General CDC Coronavirus URL:

https://www.cdc.gov/washington/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/index.html

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/wr/mm6908e1.htm

https://emergency.cdc.gov/han/2020/han00429.asp

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the Bergen County Department of Health pamphlet and I give them full credit for this information. Please see the websites above for more information about the virus.

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Clean Hands/Stop Germs! Wash your hands!

Cleans Hands/Stop Germs! Wash your hands!

When?

*After using the bathroom

*Before during and after preparing food

*Before and after caring for someone at home who is sick with vomiting or diarrhea

*After changing diapers or cleaning up a child who has used the toilet

*After blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing

*After touching an animal, animal feed or animal waste

*After handling pet food or pet treats

*After touching garbage

How?

*Wet your hands with clean running water (warm or cold) turn off the tap and apply soap.

*Lather your hands together with the soap. Be sure to lather the backs of your hands, between your fingers and under your nails.

Scrub you hands for least 20 seconds. Need a timer? Hum the “Happy Birthday” song from beginning to end twice.

*Rinse hands well under clean, running water.

*Dry hands using a clean towel or air dry them

Keeping your hands clean is one of the most important things we can do to stop the spread of germs and stay healthy. Life is better with clean hands.

http://www.cdc.gov/handwashing

https://www.cdc.gov/washington/index.html

Disclaimer: This information comes from the CDC pamphlet and I give them full credit for this information. Please check out their website for more items on the illness.

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COVID-19-Coronavirus Disease: Stop the Spread of Germs

COVID-19-Coronavirus Disease: Stop the Spread of Germs

*Help Prevent the spread of respiratory disease like COVID-19

*Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

*Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue then throw the tissue in the trash.

*Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.

*Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

*Stay home when you are sick except to get medical care.

*Wash your hand often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.

**For more information go to: http://www.cdc.gov/COVID19

https://www.cdc.gov/washington/index.html

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the Center for Disease Control pamphlet and I give them full credit for the information. Please stay safe everyone.

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CDC-Center for Disease Control: Facts about COVID-19

CDC-Center for Disease Control: Facts about COVID-19: Know the facts about coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and help stop the spread of rumors.

  1. Diseases can make anyone sick regardless of their race or ethnicity:

People of Asian descent including Chinese Americans are no more likely to get COVID-19 than any other American. Help stop fear by letting people know that being of Asian descent does not increase the chance of getting or spreading COVID-19.

2. The risk of getting COVID-19 in the U.S. is currently low.

Some people who traveled to places where many people have gotten sick with COVID-19 may be monitored by health officials to protect their health and the health of other people in the community.

3. Someone who has completed quarantine or has been released from isolation does not pose a risk of infection to other people

4. You can help stop COVID-19 by knowing the signs and symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

Seek medical advice if you have traveled to China in the past 14 days and feel sick. Call ahead before you go to a doctor’s office or emergency room. Tell them about your recent travel and your symptoms.

5. There are simple things you can do to help keep yourself and others healthy.

*Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom, before eating and after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.

*Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

*Stay home when you are sick.

*Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue then throw the tissue in the trash.

Disclaimer: This information comes from the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD), Division of Viral Diseases and I give them full credit for it. Please check out their website for more information.

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Project Child Find: Is a Child in your life Developing Differently or having leanring Problems?

Project Child Find: Help is Available!

Is a Child in your life developing differently or having learning problems?

Including migrant and homeless children (children 3-21)

If you are concerned your child is developing or learning differently and you live in New Jersey, call your public school district at the number below.

*A free referral service and public awareness campaign to assist in the identification of youth with a delay or disability from birth through the age of 21.

*Is a child in your life developing differently or having problems learning? If so, help is available for eligible children in New Jersey.

How to get help for Special Education and 504 Services.

If your would like to request an evaluation for your child, send a written request for an evaluation to your public school district special education department. Include your child’s name, age, address and suspected disability and your contact information.

After receiving your written request, the district will contact you to set up a meeting. At this meeting, you and the team will decide if an evaluation is needed and what the evaluation will include. Evaluation, professional guidance and an education program (if needed) are all available at no charge through the public school in the town where you live.

Regional V Council for Special Education (201) 599-0585

Bergenfield (201) 385-6956

Cresskill (201) 227-7791 (x1202)

Dumont (201) 387-3086

Hackensack (201) 646-8012

Maywood (201) 845-9110

New Milford (201) 261-0640

Oradell (201) 261-1153

Ridgefield (201) 261-1993

River Dell (201) 599-7220

Rochelle Park (201) 843-3126

Tenafly (201) 816-4534

Teaneck (201) 833-5490

Call for more information on Special Education and 504 Services

Additional information can be accessed at the following web address or phone number:

http://www.state.nj.us/njded/specialed

https://www.nj.gov/education/specialed/childfind/

1-800-322-8174

TTY: (609) 984-8432

Toll free hours a day

Infants and toddlers (under age three)

If your child should be crawling, walking or talking but is not, call for information about resources and services for your child under the age of 3: New Jersey Early Intervention System Statewide toll-free number: 1-888-NJ-EI-INFO, 1-888-653-4463.

Disclaimer: This information was taken from the Project Child Find pamphlet and I give them full credit for the information. Please call them directly for more about the program.

 

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Maywood, NJ Police Department First in the Country to offer FREE Scent Collection Kits to At-Risk/Disabled Residents

Maywood, NJ Police Department first in the country to offer FREE Scent Collection Kits for at-risk/disabled residents.

The Maywood, NJ Police department K-9 Unit is the fist in the country to partner with Find ‘Em Scent Safe’s, an organization that provides an all-in-one, do-it-yourself human scent collection kit for at-risk/disabled persons.

The MPD has the only scent-specific bloodhound in Bergen County, who will utilize the scent kit if the resident ever goes missing, which will aid in the rapid and safe return of that person.

Simultaneously, the MPD will update its at-risk/disabled resident registration. Such things that are included in the registration form are emergency contact information, special consideration, hide-a-key locations etc.

Residents/family members can obtain a registration form at the Police headquarters 24/7/365. Those who qualify for a FREE scent kit will be contacted for pick-up upon return of the registration form.

Find’Em: Helping you locate your loved one:

The Maywood, NJ Police department forms that first law enforcement partnership in the country with Find’Em Scent Safe, a proven third-party tested scent collection and storage system of person’s unique scent. FREE to Qualified Individuals..

For information, registration and to obtain your FREE Find’Em Scent safe, Maywood Residents contact:

Detective Chris Nichols at (201) 845-2900, Ext. 145 or email cnichols@maywoodpd.org.

Eligibility for a FREE Scent safe Maywood residency and one of the following:

*Elderly

*Disabled

*Otherwise at risk for wandering

Non-residents can purchase a scent kit at http://www.findemscent.com

Find’Em facts:

*Scent discrimination means that every person has their own scent and a dog can tell the difference.

*The dog will follow one person’s scent, exclusively. This is critical when looking for a lost loved one.

*The better the scent item, the clearer the trail.

*Scent discrimination K9s are recognized by the court as material witnesses.

Statistics:

*An estimated 5.7 million Americans of all ages are living with Alzheimer’s dementia in 2018-Alzheimer’s Association.

*Nearly half of parents reported that a child with ASD has attempted to wander or run away at least once after age 4-autismspeaks.org.

*Law enforcement sources say that 3 hours is the critical time window for location a missing person.

For more information on the Find’Em Scent Safe, please visit FindemScent safe.com.

Disclaimer: This information comes from the Maywood, NJ Police Department and I give them full credit for the information on the program. Please contact them directly for more insights to the program at the numbers or email above.

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